Effects of dietary electrolyte balance and addition of electrolyte–betaine supplements in feed or water on performance, acid–base balance and water retention in heat-stressed broilersBritish Poultry Science

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Authors
M. A. M. Sayed, J. Downing
Year
2015
DOI
10.1080/00071668.2014.995594
Subject
Animal Science and Zoology / Food Science

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Effects of dietary electrolyte balance and addition of electrolyte-betaine supplements in feed or water on performance, acid-base balance and water retention in heat stressed broilers

M. A. M. Sayeda & J. Downingb a The Faculty of Agriculture, Assiut University, Assiut, 71515, Egypt b The Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, 2570 Australia

Accepted author version posted online: 06 Jan 2015.

To cite this article: M. A. M. Sayed & J. Downing (2015): Effects of dietary electrolyte balance and addition of electrolyte-betaine supplements in feed or water on performance, acid-base balance and water retention in heat stressed broilers, British Poultry Science, DOI: 10.1080/00071668.2014.995594

To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00071668.2014.995594

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Ac ce pte d M an us cri pt

Publisher: Taylor & Francis & British Poultry Science Ltd

Journal: British Poultry Science

DOI: 10.1080/00071668.2014.995594

Effects of dietary electrolyte balance and addition of electrolyte-betaine supplements in feed or water on performance, acid-base balance and water retention in heat stressed broilers

M. A. M. SAYED AND J. DOWNINGP1 P

The Faculty of Agriculture, Assiut University, Assiut, 71515, Egypt and P1PThe Faculty of

Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, 2570 Australia

Correspondence to: Mohamed Sayed, Faculty of Agriculture, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

Telephone: 002 088 2185729.

Fax: 002 088 2331384.

E-mail: Umohamed.sayed4@agr.au.edu.egU

Running title: Dietary electrolyte-betaine supplements

Accepted for publication 20th October 2014

CBPS-2014-170

Ed. Kjaer, November 2014; MacLeod, December 2014

D ow nl oa de d by [N ew

Y or k U niv ers ity ] a t 1 3:2 8 1 1 J an ua ry 20 15

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Abstract. 1. The effects of dietary electrolyte balance (DEB) and electrolyte-betaine supplements (EL-Be) on heat stressed broiler performance, acid-base balance and water retention were evaluated during the period 31-40 d of age in a 2×3 factorial arrangement of treatments. 2. A total of 240 broilers were assigned to 6 treatment groups each with 8 replicates of 5 birds per cage and were exposed to cyclic high temperature (32 – 24 ± 1ºC). Birds were provided with diets having DEB of either 180 or 220 mEq/kg. EL-Be supplements were either added to the diet, water or not added to either of them to complete the array of 6 treatment groups. 3. An additional 80 birds were kept at thermo-neutral temperature (20 ± 1ºC) and were provided with tap water and diets with DEB of either 180 or 220 mEq/kg to serve as negative controls. 4. Exposure to high temperature depressed growth performance, increased rectal temperature and decreased potassium (K+) retention. In high temperature room, birds fed on diets with DEB of 220 mEq/kg tended to increase BW from 35-40 d of age. However, at thermo-neutral temperature, broilers fed on diets with DEB of 220 mEq/kg increased K+ retention. 5. Adding EL-Be supplements in feed or water improved FCR, enhanced water consumption and increased K+ and sodium (Na+) retention. 6. Interactions between DEB and El-Be supplements tended to affect body weight gain and

FCR during the periods 35-40 and 31-40 d of age, respectively. It is suggested that when using a diet with DEB of 180 mEq/kg, adding the El-Be supplements in drinking water was more beneficial than in feed. Adding the supplements in feed or water was equally useful when using

DEB of 220 mEq/kg.

INTRODUCTION

Heat stress affects the performance of broiler chickens and is responsible for a series of physiological and biochemical reactions, including oxidative damage, acid-base imbalance, increased osmotic pressure and increased loss of body water that can result in prostration and even death. The adverse effects of heat stress include decreased feed intake, impaired feed