Anti-quorum Sensing Effetcs of Ethanolic Crude Extract of Anethum graveolens L.Journal of Essential Oil Bearing Plants

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Authors
Milad Makhfian, Nader Hassanzadeh, Esmaeil Mahmoudi, Nazyar Zandyavari
Year
2015
DOI
10.1080/0972060X.2014.998718
Subject
Organic Chemistry / Analytical Chemistry / Biochemistry

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Anti-quorum Sensing Effetcs of Ethanolic Crude Extract of Anethum graveolens L.

Milad Makhfiana, Nader Hassanzadeha, Esmaeil Mahmoudib & Nazyar Zandyavaria a Department of Plant Pathology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University,

Tehran, Iran b Department of Plant Protection, Isfahan (Khorasgan) Branch, Islamic Azad University,

Isfahan, Iran

Published online: 09 Jul 2015.

To cite this article: Milad Makhfian, Nader Hassanzadeh, Esmaeil Mahmoudi & Nazyar Zandyavari (2015) Anti-quorum Sensing

Effetcs of Ethanolic Crude Extract of Anethum graveolens L., Journal of Essential Oil Bearing Plants, 18:3, 687-696, DOI: 10.1080/0972060X.2014.998718

To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0972060X.2014.998718

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Anti-quorum Sensing Effetcs of Ethanolic Crude Extract of Anethum graveolens L.

Milad Makhfian 1, Nader Hassanzadeh 1, Esmaeil Mahmoudi 2*, Nazyar Zandyavari 1 1 Department of Plant Pathology, Science and Research Branch,

Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran 2 Department of Plant Protection, Isfahan (Khorasgan) Branch,

Islamic Azad University, Isfahan, Iran

Abstract: In the recent years, effort to interfere with the quorum sensing (QS) has taken researchers consideration into the discovery and identification of bioactive compounds secreted by prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this research, the anti-QS activity of thirty one plant species was detected through the inhibition of the QS related behaviors, violacein pigmentation in Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and plant tissue maceration in Pectobacterium carotovorum. The results revealed that the arial parts extract of seven plant species interfered quorum sensing phenotypes in bacteria which amoung them, the dill (Anethum graveolens

L.) extract effectively inhibited violacein production in CV026 and singificantly reduced tissue maceration in test plants. The result substantiates that the dill extract has decreased (>13 mm) violacein production in biosensor besides possessing slight antimicrobial property (<7.5 mm). Both potato tubers and calla-lily slices inoculated with Pcc-extract showed significant reduction in tissue maceration, while the tubers and slices inoculated with

Pcc and Pcc-DMSO were strongly macerated. GC-MS analysis of the A. graveolens extract indicated that the oil was consisted eight phytocompounds of which the Eugenol (49.62 %) as major component. This results suggest that plants have mimic quorum-sensing signals which could be serving as potential sources to disrupt quorum sensing in associated bacteria.

Key words: Anethum graveolens, antimicrobial activity, anti-QS, Pectobacterium, violacein.

Introduction

In a wide variety of bacteria, diverse biochemical activities are under the control of a sophisticated density-dependent phenomenon referred to as quorum sensing (QS). The QS is mediated through some small signaling molecules termed as autoinducers enable the bacteria to coordinate their different physiological behaviours 8. Varied clusters of QS chemical signals have already been identified. N-Acyl homoserine lactones (NAHLs), extracellular molecules produced by the family of LuxI homologue proteins, are the most studied signal discovered in more than 70 species of Gram negative bacteria like Proteobacteria 11,15,19. The AHL-based mechanism controls diverse gene expression, which is in charge of a broad array of indigenous phenotypes in bacteria, including formation of biofilm, swarming, bioluminescence, antibiotic production, virulence determinants secretion etc 5,26. In Pectobacterium carotovorum, a phytopathogenic bacterium responsible for soft-rot disease, cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs) and harpin production, as the main factors of virulence, are controlled by N-AHSL such as C6HSL (oxo hexanoyl-N-homoserine lactone) or C8HSL (octanoyl homoserine lactone) 3,25,26. The increase of multidrug resistance because of the

ISSN Print: 0972-060X

ISSN Online: 0976-5026 *Corresponding authors (Esmaeil Mahmoudi)

E-mail: < e.mahmoudi@khuisf.ac.ir > © 2015, Har Krishan Bhalla & Sons

Received 11 February 2014; accepted in revised form 23 August 2014

TEOP 18 (3) 2015 pp 687 - 696 687

D ow nl oa de d by [U niv ers ity of

O tag o] at 22 :07 13

Ju ly 20 15 misuse of antibiotics has obliged researchers to look for alternative procedures in order to control bacterial contamination without encouraging genetically new resistances. For these, there is growing interest in the potential of untapped microbial, plant and animal sources to yield novel molecules, scaffolds and pharmacophores for a new generation of antibacterial drugs. Some environmental niches occupied by complex of micro/macro-organisms are only just beginning to be explored and, in combination with genomics and advanced genetic engineering, may provide new and exciting leads for the next generation of antimicrobial agents 23.